Tag: student engagement

Michael Toth in Edweek: The Value of Peer Teaching

This excerpt was originally published in Edweek, Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo Blog Michael D. Toth is the author of the award-winning book, Who Moved My Standards, the co-author with David Sousa of Improving Social, Emotional, and Cognitive Learning Through Academic Teaming (forthcoming, 2019), and the co-author with Dr. Robert J. Marzano of The Essentials for

The Power of We: An Interview with Ron Nash

Author Ron Nash talks about his new book The Power of We: Creating Positive and Collaborative Classroom Communities and its supplemental guide And What About You? Getting Started with Interactive Pairs and Small Groups. (This transcription has been edited for clarity) I’m Ron Nash and in 2007, after 46 years,

The six-picture format is versatile enough to use with any type of content

Increase Instructional Rigor with the Six Pictures Activity

The relationships you build with students will impact their performance. The six pictures activity can help you get to know them while increasing student engagement and enhancing your instruction. This versatile strategy helps students: Consider multiple aspects of the content Organize and remember information Distinguish key information from supporting details

6 Classroom Activities to Help Students Express Gratitude

Thanksgiving might be the best holiday to harvest for learning opportunities (no pun intended), but many teachers default to having the students draw turkeys using their hands or making pilgrim hats out of construction paper. That’s a waste. The theme of Thanksgiving is, of course, gratitude. That falls clearly within

Learning Target Deconstruction

By Theresa Staley Of all the “wow!” moments in my educational career, I believe observing my students as they mastered their learning targets has been the most profound. This mastery involved a demonstration of student evidence to show they “got it” and could attach it to larger ideas and concepts. Through

Hey, Teachers! Take the Training Wheels Off

By Kara Bentley To develop into independent thinkers, students need to become autonomous in the classroom. While this doesn’t mean they always need to work independently, it does mean that they need to own their learning; deepen their understanding of instruction, and use provided resources to apply their knowledge to

Helping Students Create Their Own Learning Tasks

By Scott Sterling Teachers should not be the masters of the educational experience of their students. Students should have just as much input into what goes on in the room, especially in the later stages of the learning process. An excellent way to give students this control is through allowing

Using Homework to Deliver New Content

By Scott Sterling Most teachers choose to use their in-class time to deliver new content. The thinking is that students will naturally struggle, productively or otherwise, when they encounter the unknown. When that struggle occurs, the teacher wants to be there. In correlation, homework is reserved for practice. But isn’t

Using Homework to Develop Fluency

By Scott Sterling Fluency in the core subject areas is not much different than fluency in foreign language classes; it is the ability to readily recall new knowledge with very little struggle. It falls under what we call procedural knowledge. Fluency is also a great place for homework to make