Category: growth mindset

New Report on “What Teens Want”

By Jennifer A. Cleary and Terry A. Morgan, co-authors of Classroom Techniques for Creating Conditions for Rigorous Instruction The Fordham Institute’s newly released report on student engagement initially delivers quite a dose of bad news. A national survey of 2000 public, charter, and private school students finds that students who consider dropping

Becoming an Expert Teacher Was My Biggest Mistake!

By Jennifer Cleary, co-author of Classroom Techniques for Creating Conditions for Rigorous Instruction Like most teachers, I’m the type of person who takes pride in hard work, and I want that hard work to show. When I take on a new project or learn a new skill, I want to become an

Making Long-Lasting Impressions on Teachers and Students

School Superintendent Julia Espe likes to refer to a quotation from Israeli teacher Haim Ginott: “Children are like wet cement. Whatever falls on them makes an impression.” For the past several years, Espe has been endeavoring to ensure that whatever “falls” on the students in her Princeton, Minnesota school district

The Benefits of Investigative Tasks

By Scott Sterling We’ve been talking a lot about students developing hypotheses and how that can add rigor to your classroom activities. Mostly, these lessons have resembled the scientific process, even if they could be converted to use in the other subject areas. Investigative tasks are a bit different. They

Tasks that Expand a Student’s Decision-Making Skills

By Scott Sterling Providing students autonomy in learning tasks is a key component of rigor. Tasks are simply less rigorous when students receive more guidance and less productive struggle. There are many ways to generate that autonomy, but key among them is providing tasks in which students have to choose

Getting Students to Think Deeply About Their Work

By Scott Sterling As we are all familiar by now, one of rigor’s most important components is autonomy for students. Part of working autonomously is the opportunity for students to reflect on what’s working, what’s not, and where they go from here. This level of metacognition rarely comes as an