Tag: teacher growth

Feedback comes in many varieties—and they’re all useful

Deliberate Practice in the Wake of a Bad Observation

By Scott Sterling As a teacher, you’re used to observations, especially if you work in a Marzano-inspired system. You do your best to prepare, but sometimes things just don’t go as planned. Perhaps a projector bulb blows, a more challenging student had extra Nutella with breakfast, or it’s just that

Not this kind of TLC (although there are days where this would be nice)

Consider a TLC to Improve Your Formative Assessment Strategies

By Learning Sciences Dylan Wiliam Center Staff On this blog, we’ve had quite a few posts on teacher collaboration, professional development, and PLC scheduling. It’s important for educators to work together to improve their practice. PLCs are a common structure to foster collaboration and accountability. But they’re not the only

She receives immediate feedback during her practice. You, on the other hand, do not

Tech Tools for Deliberate Practice

By Scott Sterling The great teachers, and those on the way to achieving greatness, view their craft as a process—and processes should always lead to improvement. The strategies and steps you take in that process are what make up deliberate practice. However, if you think deliberate practice can only be

You may want to be a little more organized than this.

Effective Student Surveys and How They Inform Instruction

by Scott Sterling, Learning Sciences International Let’s have fun with a metaphor. If your school were a car dealership, whose job would everyone have? You, the teacher, are obviously a salesperson. In fact, many attempts have been made to equate education with sales. Your assistant principals might be service managers,