Tag: rigor

The six-picture format is versatile enough to use with any type of content

Increase Instructional Rigor with the Six Pictures Activity

The relationships you build with students will impact their performance. The six pictures activity can help you get to know them while increasing student engagement and enhancing your instruction. This versatile strategy helps students: Consider multiple aspects of the content Organize and remember information Distinguish key information from supporting details

Vision Day at Des Moines Public Schools

Reflecting on a Vision of Instruction at Des Moines Public Schools

By Kara Bentley On August 21, I celebrated in Des Moines with administrators and instructional staff of Monroe Elementary School as we engaged in productive struggle to craft our vision of instruction for the 2017-2018 school year. To succeed at building our new vision as Schools for Rigor, participants had

Tasks that Expand a Student’s Decision-Making Skills

By Scott Sterling Providing students autonomy in learning tasks is a key component of rigor. Tasks are simply less rigorous when students receive more guidance and less productive struggle. There are many ways to generate that autonomy, but key among them is providing tasks in which students have to choose

Helping Students Create Their Own Learning Tasks

By Scott Sterling Teachers should not be the masters of the educational experience of their students. Students should have just as much input into what goes on in the room, especially in the later stages of the learning process. An excellent way to give students this control is through allowing

Getting Students to Think Deeply About Their Work

By Scott Sterling As we are all familiar by now, one of rigor’s most important components is autonomy for students. Part of working autonomously is the opportunity for students to reflect on what’s working, what’s not, and where they go from here. This level of metacognition rarely comes as an

Cooperative Learning’s Role in Rigor

By Scott Sterling Not surprisingly, when the 21st century college and career readiness standards were unveiled, they all called for increased rigor in the classroom. One of the ways they suggested to accomplish that goal, as well as to prepare students for the stresses of the 21st century economy, was