Immediate feedback needs to be provided or bad habits will take hold

How to Guide Students Through Their Practice

By Scott Sterling By now, we’re all familiar with the gradual release model, sometimes shortened to I do; We do; You do. It just makes sense for teachers to help students acquire new skills using some form of this method. That being said, it can be argued that the I

Building Expertise 2014

Highlights of Building Expertise 2014

By Scott Sterling It’s hard to believe we’re coming up on another edition of Building Expertise. The signature Marzano conference gets bigger every year, attracting more and more of the brightest minds in education and the most dedicated teachers. This year’s conference, Journey to Rigor, will be held at Disney’s

Building Expertise

Sessions to Look Forward to at Building Expertise 2015

By Scott Sterling It’s hard to believe that Building Expertise is right around the corner again! The signature Marzano conference gets bigger every year, attracting more and more of the brightest minds in education and the most dedicated teachers. This year’s edition, Journey to Rigor, will be held at Disney’s

Without formal processing strategies, content can be forgotten

Processing New Information and the Long-Term Memory

Learning isn’t just about memorization of facts and critical information; it involves the retention of information for later use and transferring knowledge to the long‐term memory. After all, you’re not just teaching content—you’re teaching students to think more deeply, even when you’re introducing brand new content. All of this takes

Knowledge utilization can be a short trip or a deeper dive.

Incorporating Rigor Into Lesson Plans

Rigor occurs when students can demonstrate mastery of a standard with autonomy. Consider the level of cognition that you want students to reach in each activity and the instructional strategies that will make that happen. Once you’ve done this, you can develop learning goals and scales that match assessment to

An architecture student’s hypothesis—it’s time to test it

Defining a Cognitively Complex Task

By Scott Sterling We often consider cognitively complex tasks as ideal classroom activities—the culmination of rigor. It’s a very specific process; for students to find success, instruction must be precise and deliberate. Luckily, one of the latest books in the Essentials for Achieving Rigor series, Engaging in Cognitively Complex Tasks,

Just like a computer, a human brain needs time to process new information

The Best Way to Present New Information

By Scott Sterling Stop me if you’ve seen this scenario before: Teacher presents new information with a lecture or video and asks students to take notes. Teacher pauses every so often to ask questions in a half-hearted attempt at formative assessment; students desperately try not to be chosen. Obligatory homework

If this is what students think of revision, no wonder they’re afraid of it

Revising Knowledge to Achieve Rigor

By Scott Sterling It’s often difficult for young people to acknowledge that something might be incorrect. That would mean the source from which they received the information, whether it was a teacher, parent, or older sibling, is fallible. Children need their information sources to be infallible. In actuality, learning occurs

Humans have always been obsessed with time—with good reason

Brain-Friendly Conditions for Assessment

By Scott Sterling In our “brain-friendly” series, building on the work of Dr. David A. Sousa and his book, Brain-Friendly Assessments: What They Are and How to Use Them, we’ve talked about the what, why, and how of assessment: What is assessment, as opposed to testing? Why do we do