The non-digital Instagram app from the 1980s

What would Abraham Lincoln share on Instagram? Social Media for Teachers

This is the fourth post in a series about social media strategies for the classroom. Previously, we discussed using Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest in instruction. Today, we’ll explore Instagram. Instagram has a reputation as the social network for self-obsessives and narcissists. It’s true that the most popular Instagrammers often fall into those

Pinterest makes it easy to organize and share ideas

Pinterest for Teachers: Using Social Media in Education

By Scott Sterling This is the third post in a series about social media strategies for the classroom. Previously, we discussed using Twitter and Facebook in instruction. We all know a teacher who forwards a nugget of wisdom from Pinterest on a daily basis. Above all the others, it’s the

Facebook can get a big thumbs-up in the classroom

Facebook for Teachers: Using Social Media in Education

By Scott Sterling Last week, we looked at ways to use Twitter in the classroom. Today, we’ll explore Facebook. Nearly 20 percent of the planet has a Facebook page. Yes, some of that is noise, but it’s also a vast network that can provide a multitude of learning experiences, as

Add the little blue bird to your toolbox

Twitter for Teachers: Using Social Media in Education

By Scott Sterling In education, Twitter has become as indispensable a tool as we have. Its implications are wide-ranging. It can help: Teachers bring the outside world into the classroom Students practice important writing skills Educators from all over the world connect with each other That’s a lot of tasks

It is possible to create a class that’s both orderly and rigorous

Where Discipline Relates to Rigor and Cognitive Complexity

By Scott Sterling Many educators believe that pedagogy and classroom management are mutually exclusive, but that’s not the case at all. You can micromanage every aspect of classroom life without ever engaging or challenging a single child. Conversely, you can present good, rigorous content without ruling with an iron fist.

Mattie Whyte Woodridge: The Inspiring History of Teacher Appreciation Week

Mattie Whyte Woodridge: The Inspiring History of Teacher Appreciation Week

Students, parents, and the community at large should recognize the important work of teachers throughout the year, but it’s nice to set aside a special week just for that purpose! Teacher Appreciation Week has become an established tradition in school districts throughout the United States, but few seem to know

Socratic Seminars: The Big Leagues of Student Questioning

By Scott Sterling One of the tenets of the Common Core and its related next generation standards is the idea that students should be able to question just as skillfully as they can answer. Nothing should be out of bounds. They should be able to rigorously question everyone in the

Performance Assessment Requires Coordinating the “Performance” and the “Assessment”

By Susan M. Brookhart, author of Performance Assessment: Showing What Students Know and Can Do. Most current learning standards ask students to do more than comprehend content knowledge. Performance assessment is a great way to find out how students can use or apply content knowledge or how they implement skills. It only

American classrooms are going to look a lot different at the end of this decade (and that’s a good thing)

Vocabulary: The Building Blocks of ELL Understanding

By Scott Sterling By the end of this decade, it has been estimated that one quarter of the nation’s students will be, at some level, English language learners. Although these students represent an opportunity to create a large group of the multilingual workers that the 21st century economy desperately requires,