Yes, a room full of 1,600 educators is quite orderly

Rigor and Assessment: Central Themes of Building Expertise 2015

By Scott Sterling Now that we’ve all recovered from last week’s Building Expertise 2015: Journey to Rigor, it’s time to reflect on what we learned and how much fun we had. There were some major themes of the conference that are worth discussing. It was huge! The conference sold out

This little ghost might actually be scary

Does Snapchat Have a Place in the Classroom? Social Media for Teachers

By Scott Sterling This is the final post in a series about social media strategies for the classroom. Previously, we discussed using Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram in instruction. Today, we’ll explore an app that’s wildly popular, yet inherently controversial: Snapchat. Snapchat basics There’s no shame in Snapchat ignorance—if you’re over the age

Dr. Marzano with Area Superintendent Ian Salzman and Calusa Elementary Principal Jamie Wyatt.

Top 10 Quotes (and Photos) from Dr. Robert J. Marzano’s Visit to Palm Beach County Schools for Rigor

Dr. Marzano with Area Superintendent Ian Salzman and Calusa Elementary Principal Jamie Wyatt. During the week of May 20th, Robert J. Marzano visited five Schools for Rigor in Palm Beach County, Florida, where he toured classrooms to see teachers implementing strategies in the Essentials for Achieving Rigor instructional model. The

The non-digital Instagram app from the 1980s

What would Abraham Lincoln share on Instagram? Social Media for Teachers

This is the fourth post in a series about social media strategies for the classroom. Previously, we discussed using Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest in instruction. Today, we’ll explore Instagram. Instagram has a reputation as the social network for self-obsessives and narcissists. It’s true that the most popular Instagrammers often fall into those

Pinterest makes it easy to organize and share ideas

Pinterest for Teachers: Using Social Media in Education

By Scott Sterling This is the third post in a series about social media strategies for the classroom. Previously, we discussed using Twitter and Facebook in instruction. We all know a teacher who forwards a nugget of wisdom from Pinterest on a daily basis. Above all the others, it’s the

Facebook can get a big thumbs-up in the classroom

Facebook for Teachers: Using Social Media in Education

By Scott Sterling Last week, we looked at ways to use Twitter in the classroom. Today, we’ll explore Facebook. Nearly 20 percent of the planet has a Facebook page. Yes, some of that is noise, but it’s also a vast network that can provide a multitude of learning experiences, as

Add the little blue bird to your toolbox

Twitter for Teachers: Using Social Media in Education

By Scott Sterling In education, Twitter has become as indispensable a tool as we have. Its implications are wide-ranging. It can help: Teachers bring the outside world into the classroom Students practice important writing skills Educators from all over the world connect with each other That’s a lot of tasks

It is possible to create a class that’s both orderly and rigorous

Where Discipline Relates to Rigor and Cognitive Complexity

By Scott Sterling Many educators believe that pedagogy and classroom management are mutually exclusive, but that’s not the case at all. You can micromanage every aspect of classroom life without ever engaging or challenging a single child. Conversely, you can present good, rigorous content without ruling with an iron fist.

Mattie Whyte Woodridge: The Inspiring History of Teacher Appreciation Week

Mattie Whyte Woodridge: The Inspiring History of Teacher Appreciation Week

Students, parents, and the community at large should recognize the important work of teachers throughout the year, but it’s nice to set aside a special week just for that purpose! Teacher Appreciation Week has become an established tradition in school districts throughout the United States, but few seem to know