Category: Teacher effectiveness

Tip for Teachers: “Wrong” Answers Are the Ones That Deepen Learning

By Shannon Pretorius You ask your class a question, expecting a particular answer. You planned for that answer, but the students’ responses are completely different from what you anticipated. What do you do? Too many times, I’ve seen teachers barely acknowledge the unexpected answers and say something like, “No, that’s

The Three Weights on Hispanic and Latino Students: Balancing School, Family, and Community

By Jaime Castellano, author of Educating Hispanic and Latino Students Today in 2018, one in four American children are of Hispanic or Latino origin. With Hispanic/Latino students making up such a large percentage of our schools, we would expect to see them spread proportionally across the spectrum of student success; but

High fives at Lodge Community School in Evansville, Indiana

Verifying Learning: Who Learned the Lesson in These Scenarios?

By Shannon Pretorius You have the most amazing math lesson planned for today. It is interactive, engaging, requires student collaboration, and you didn’t even have to spend your own money to fund it. Students will be analyzing classroom objects based on their attributes and classifying them into specific geometric categories.

An Invitation From Dr. Robert J. Marzano

Dear Friends, Please join me at the 7th Annual Building Expertise 2018 National Conference June 13-15 at Disney’s Coronado Springs Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. I’m excited to be a part of this year’s event, which includes some truly inspirational and expert education thought leaders including Freedom Writer Manny

Building Rigor and Engagement Into Academic Vocabulary

Building Rigor and Engagement Into Academic Vocabulary

Six tips to get students excited about acquiring new words. By Kristin DeJong Remember the days when a teacher would hand us a spelling book and tell us to complete exercises in it? We would memorize each word and then take a dictation quiz at the end of the unit.

No, It Is Not the “The End of Grades”

by Ken O’Connor, author of The Standards-Based Grading Quick-Reference Guide. Sue Brookhart says that “in a perfect world, there would be no grades –at least, not as we know them now (i.e., traditional A-F grades based on averaging).”1 I agree with her, but I disagree with a recent blog post

Building a Student-Centered School

Resisting the Urge to “Rescue” Students from Deeper Learning By Amy M. Dujon (originally published on Smartbrief), author of The Gritty Truth of School Transformation. This is an exciting era in education. We’re all starting to realize that the most effective way to prepare learners for the uncertain demands of the

Ignite Student-Centered Learning

Student-Centered Learning Starts Here: Grand Island Public Schools

“Having those conversations with their peers was so empowering for them that it just became a natural part of what they were doing.” — Walnut Middle School teacher Elizabeth Boyle This year, three schools in Grand Island, Nebraska are igniting student learning through a Schools for Rigor partnership with Learning

#RiseGI: Igniting Student Ownership in Grand Island, Nebraska

By Theresa Staley The Jefferson Elementary School faculty, along with 255 K–5 students, are currently housed in a temporary location across the city, as a new site is under construction and will open in August 2020. Therefore, the teachers, coach, and school administrator, Mrs. Sheree Stockwell, have innovatively created a

Lockerman Middle School's Coaching Tree

Lockerman Middle School: The Vision, the Work, the Legacy

By Theresa Staley How a Maryland school has come together to alter its legacy and move the needle for students. Not far from the eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay lies the picturesque countryside of Denton, Maryland, where the bellowing wails of Wildcat honor personify the solidarity and spirit of