Category: Student Engagement

Is Technology Shortening Students’ Attention Spans?

The answer might surprise you. According to Dr. David A. Sousa, educational neuroscience consultant and award-winning author of Engaging the Rewired Brain, the answer is no… with a big qualifier. No, technology doesn’t shorten students’ attention spans. Today’s learners are capable of focusing on one thing for just as long

Image courtesy of Des Moines Public Schools: https://www.flickr.com/photos/dmps/36962770821/in/album-72157686316235914/

Success Criteria: A Five-Star Recipe for Students

By Kara Bentley Teachers, when your students walk into your classroom… Do they know what they’re going to be learning? Do they know what they NEED to know to demonstrate understanding of content? Are they prepared to autonomously apply their knowledge to successfully complete a task? Do they have exemplars

To Exist or Not Exist? How Student Autonomy Changes the Classroom: Part 2

By Kristin DeJong Last time around, we introduced you to the idea of implementing a few new strategies to lighten your teaching load and promote more student-centered learning in the process. Today, we round out that list with a few more ideas you’ll be doing in no time. Establish Team Roles

To Exist or Not Exist? How Student Autonomy Changes the Classroom: Part 1

By Kristin DeJong The greatest sign of success for a teacher is to be able to say, “The children are now working as if I did not exist.” As a new school year begins, I’m reminded of this quotation from the famed physician and educator, Maria Montessori, and I often

What to Do When a New Student Has a Language Barrier

By Scott Sterling Students who speak a language other than English at home are projected to make up a third of the nation’s public school students by the end of the decade. This is a huge demographic shift being felt not only by states like California, Texas, and Florida, but

Hey, Teachers! Take the Training Wheels Off

By Kara Bentley To develop into independent thinkers, students need to become autonomous in the classroom. While this doesn’t mean they always need to work independently, it does mean that they need to own their learning; deepen their understanding of instruction, and use provided resources to apply their knowledge to