Category: Dr. Robert Marzano

Without formal processing strategies, content can be forgotten

Processing New Information and the Long-Term Memory

Learning isn’t just about memorization of facts and critical information; it involves the retention of information for later use and transferring knowledge to the long‐term memory. After all, you’re not just teaching content—you’re teaching students to think more deeply, even when you’re introducing brand new content. All of this takes

Knowledge utilization can be a short trip or a deeper dive.

Incorporating Rigor Into Lesson Plans

Rigor occurs when students can demonstrate mastery of a standard with autonomy. Consider the level of cognition that you want students to reach in each activity and the instructional strategies that will make that happen. Once you’ve done this, you can develop learning goals and scales that match assessment to

An architecture student’s hypothesis—it’s time to test it

Defining a Cognitively Complex Task

By Scott Sterling We often consider cognitively complex tasks as ideal classroom activities—the culmination of rigor. It’s a very specific process; for students to find success, instruction must be precise and deliberate. Luckily, one of the latest books in the Essentials for Achieving Rigor series, Engaging in Cognitively Complex Tasks,

Just like a computer, a human brain needs time to process new information

The Best Way to Present New Information

By Scott Sterling Stop me if you’ve seen this scenario before: Teacher presents new information with a lecture or video and asks students to take notes. Teacher pauses every so often to ask questions in a half-hearted attempt at formative assessment; students desperately try not to be chosen. Obligatory homework

If this is what students think of revision, no wonder they’re afraid of it

Revising Knowledge to Achieve Rigor

By Scott Sterling It’s often difficult for young people to acknowledge that something might be incorrect. That would mean the source from which they received the information, whether it was a teacher, parent, or older sibling, is fallible. Children need their information sources to be infallible. In actuality, learning occurs

Even this comparison can be made more rigorous

Deepening Students’ Knowledge Using Similarities & Differences

By Scott Sterling Just like a computer or office, the brain needs to organize information in a way that makes it easily accessible while enabling further growth. For example, if you can’t classify and find information related to the solar system, how are you supposed to understand astrophysics? Students need

The tools have changed, but the skills are still just as crucial

The Importance of Recording and Representing Knowledge

By Scott Sterling You would think that needing to understand how to record and represent knowledge has lost importance in the age of smartphones, BYOD, and tablets. After all, to record knowledge, a student only has to tap the “record” button. That practice might accomplish one goal (having access to

Might be complex, but not necessarily rigorous.

Increasing Rigor for ELL Students

by Scott Sterling We talk a lot about rigor here, and we will continue to do so. At Learning Sciences International, we believe that a lack of rigor is one of the primary factors determining whether or not a school is succeeding. And with most of us implementing new, more

Goals and Scales Are the Backbone of Rigor

To know what success looks like, you need the right goal. By: Scott Sterling, Learning Sciences International Many schools require teachers to post or write their learning goals on the board before each class. Some want those goals in kid-friendly language; others don’t care if you copy the standard’s text