Category: Common Core

No, It Is Not the “The End of Grades”

by Ken O’Connor, author of The Standards-Based Grading Quick-Reference Guide. Sue Brookhart says that “in a perfect world, there would be no grades –at least, not as we know them now (i.e., traditional A-F grades based on averaging).”1 I agree with her, but I disagree with a recent blog post

The six-picture format is versatile enough to use with any type of content

Increase Instructional Rigor with the Six Pictures Activity

The relationships you build with students will impact their performance. The six pictures activity can help you get to know them while increasing student engagement and enhancing your instruction. This versatile strategy helps students: Consider multiple aspects of the content Organize and remember information Distinguish key information from supporting details

New Report on “What Teens Want”

By Jennifer A. Cleary and Terry A. Morgan, Learning Sciences International The Fordham Institute’s newly released report on student engagement initially delivers quite a dose of bad news. A national survey of 2000 public, charter, and private school students finds that students who consider dropping out of high school cite lack

Election Day Classroom Activities

By Scott Sterling Although there have been aspects of this campaign that are not appropriate for the classroom, It’s still important for students to understand and even participate in the election process. Students need to be prepared to contribute to our democracy and be able to recognize its evolution and

The Benefits of Investigative Tasks

By Scott Sterling We’ve been talking a lot about students developing hypotheses and how that can add rigor to your classroom activities. Mostly, these lessons have resembled the scientific process, even if they could be converted to use in the other subject areas. Investigative tasks are a bit different. They

Tasks that Expand a Student’s Decision-Making Skills

By Scott Sterling Providing students autonomy in learning tasks is a key component of rigor. Tasks are simply less rigorous when students receive more guidance and less productive struggle. There are many ways to generate that autonomy, but key among them is providing tasks in which students have to choose