Category: College and Career Readiness

The Benefits of Investigative Tasks

By Scott Sterling We’ve been talking a lot about students developing hypotheses and how that can add rigor to your classroom activities. Mostly, these lessons have resembled the scientific process, even if they could be converted to use in the other subject areas. Investigative tasks are a bit different. They

Giving Students Control Through Experimental Inquiry

By Scott Sterling In most pedagogical models, the goal is to move the classroom from one that is teacher-centered to student-centered. The student-centered approach provides engagement in the learning process, a certain level of personalization, and a greater chance for mastery. One way to generate that degree of a student-centered

Tasks that Expand a Student’s Decision-Making Skills

By Scott Sterling Providing students autonomy in learning tasks is a key component of rigor. Tasks are simply less rigorous when students receive more guidance and less productive struggle. There are many ways to generate that autonomy, but key among them is providing tasks in which students have to choose

Helping Students Create Their Own Learning Tasks

By Scott Sterling Teachers should not be the masters of the educational experience of their students. Students should have just as much input into what goes on in the room, especially in the later stages of the learning process. An excellent way to give students this control is through allowing

Getting Students to Think Deeply About Their Work

By Scott Sterling As we are all familiar by now, one of rigor’s most important components is autonomy for students. Part of working autonomously is the opportunity for students to reflect on what’s working, what’s not, and where they go from here. This level of metacognition rarely comes as an

Cooperative Learning’s Role in Rigor

By Scott Sterling Not surprisingly, when the 21st century college and career readiness standards were unveiled, they all called for increased rigor in the classroom. One of the ways they suggested to accomplish that goal, as well as to prepare students for the stresses of the 21st century economy, was