Year: 2016

Writing with Voice

By Mary Shea, co-author of The FIVES Strategy for Reading Comprehension Writing is an expressive language process that allows us to record thoughts, feelings, knowledge, and inspirations. That expression can be for ourselves or for an audience. Transforming ideas into written words requires considerable effort, making the message clear and interesting

Teaching Strategies for New Content: Collaborative Strategies

By Scott Sterling This is the second in a series of three blog posts discussing research-based teaching strategies that help students interact and eventually assimilate new knowledge. Education is all about presenting previously-unknown knowledge to students and have them incorporate that learning into comprehension. But as any educator will tell

Time of Wonder

By Mary Shea, co-author of The FIVES Strategy for Reading Comprehension Wondering is the mind’s query to itself — questioning observed phenomena, seeking information about the unknown, or solving a problem or puzzle. It’s a natural force that drives learning from the first breath of life. Effective teachers harness this energy

Making Long-Lasting Impressions on Teachers and Students

School Superintendent Julia Espe likes to refer to a quotation from Israeli teacher Haim Ginott: “Children are like wet cement. Whatever falls on them makes an impression.” For the past several years, Espe has been endeavoring to ensure that whatever “falls” on the students in her Princeton, Minnesota school district

Election Day Classroom Activities

By Scott Sterling Although there have been aspects of this campaign that are not appropriate for the classroom, It’s still important for students to understand and even participate in the election process. Students need to be prepared to contribute to our democracy and be able to recognize its evolution and

Guest Post: Principal-ed Leadership

By Lillie G. Jessie, author of the Quick Reference Guide, 10 Principal’s Principles for High Performance in Diverse, Low-Income Schools Dr. Jeff Howard of the Efficacy Institute once wrote an article asking educators, “Whose Children Are These?” Until you can answer, “Mine,” he said, we’ll never achieve high levels of student