Month: February 2015

Knowledge utilization can be a short trip or a deeper dive.

Incorporating Rigor Into Lesson Plans

Rigor occurs when students can demonstrate mastery of a standard with autonomy. Consider the level of cognition that you want students to reach in each activity and the instructional strategies that will make that happen. Once you’ve done this, you can develop learning goals and scales that match assessment to

An architecture student’s hypothesis—it’s time to test it

Defining a Cognitively Complex Task

By Scott Sterling We often consider cognitively complex tasks as ideal classroom activities—the culmination of rigor. It’s a very specific process; for students to find success, instruction must be precise and deliberate. Luckily, one of the latest books in the Essentials for Achieving Rigor series, Engaging in Cognitively Complex Tasks,

Just like a computer, a human brain needs time to process new information

The Best Way to Present New Information

By Scott Sterling Stop me if you’ve seen this scenario before: Teacher presents new information with a lecture or video and asks students to take notes. Teacher pauses every so often to ask questions in a half-hearted attempt at formative assessment; students desperately try not to be chosen. Obligatory homework

If this is what students think of revision, no wonder they’re afraid of it

Revising Knowledge to Achieve Rigor

By Scott Sterling It’s often difficult for young people to acknowledge that something might be incorrect. That would mean the source from which they received the information, whether it was a teacher, parent, or older sibling, is fallible. Children need their information sources to be infallible. In actuality, learning occurs