Month: September 2014

Not this kind of TLC (although there are days where this would be nice)

Consider a TLC to Improve Your Formative Assessment Strategies

By Learning Sciences Dylan Wiliam Center Staff On this blog, we’ve had quite a few posts on teacher collaboration, professional development, and PLC scheduling. It’s important for educators to work together to improve their practice. PLCs are a common structure to foster collaboration and accountability. But they’re not the only

Believe it or not, this isn’t the goal

Classroom Formative Assessment Without the Awkwardness

By Dylan Wiliam Center staff Formative assessment might be the most critical thing you can do in a classroom to affect student success. In fact, studies have shown 25% to 50% increases in student learning when teachers use classroom formative assessment strategies. These are among the largest gains ever reported for educational

Does this remind you of your classroom? That could be a good thing

Harnessing Controversy and Conflict in Class

By Scott Sterling Last month, we discussed conative skills. You won’t find conative skills on many pacing guides or curricula, but students need to master them. Our list from that post included: Interpreting situations Cultivating a growth mindset Developing resiliency Avoiding negative thinking Taking various perspectives on an issue Interacting

Scaffolding seems complicated, but it’s really not

Scaffolding Lessons that Work

By Scott Sterling Most educators subscribe to some sort of notion that lessons should be scaffolded. The concept goes by many different names and forms (gradual release, various taxonomies, and even Marzano’s Art & Science of Teaching), but the constant is the (correct) idea that students should walk before they

Grading, and everything that comes before it, should be this easy

Implementing a Standards-Based Classroom

By Scott Sterling “Standards-based” is a widely used term these days, usually in reference to certain grading systems that some view as controversial. We’ll talk about grading toward the end of this post, but the key to remember is that standards-based education is nothing new. It is just rarely practiced